Painting En Plein Air Under Changing Light Art Workshop with Michael Richardson

Michael Richardson Art Workshop at Paint Out Wells 2015 Photo by Katy Jon Went

Painting Workshop in Wells, Norfolk

Paint Out Wells offers the following art workshop on Saturday 17 September in Wells-next-the-Sea, North Norfolk – Painting En Plein Air Under Changing Light Art Workshop with award-winning experienced artist and tutor, Michael Richardson.

Offered to local and visiting amateur, aspiring and experienced artists, as well as members of the Paint Out competition – all are welcome to take part.

The workshop will take place from 3pm and includes teaching and then tuition under the fading late-afternoon/early-evening light. The price is £45 with the option to participate in an early-morning paint out the following day and then brunch with the competition artists on the Albatros ship. You will need to bring your own art materials. Please book here.

Student at Michael Richardson Art Workshops at Paint Out Wells 2015 Photo by Katy Jon Went
Student at Michael Richardson Art Workshops at Paint Out Wells 2015

Michael is competing in Paint Out this year and is a veteran of Paint Out Norwich & Wells 2014-15 and plenty of other competitions and exhibitions. He won the inaugural Nocturne Prize in 2015.

About Artist Michael Richardson, UA

Michael lives in East Kent and paints almost every day, whatever the weather en plein air. As a modern Impressionist he believes that painting sur le motif is the most fulfilling challenge for a painter’s technique. His atmospheric work in both oils and watercolour has found collectors worldwide, especially in America.

Michael Richardson demonstrating at Art Workshop at Paint Out Wells 2015 Photo by Katy Jon Went
Michael Richardson demonstrating at Art Workshop at Paint Out Wells 2015

Michael was brought up in post-war Suffolk, “Constable Country”, and educated at Ipswich School and Ipswich College of Art and later in Paris.

In the 1960s his interest in sailing led him into a career in the marine industry where he specialised in sail design and manufacture. Whilst maintaining an interest in art he returned to full-time painting in 1992, yet drew on his marine experience in his specialism around painting boats.

He enjoys the plein air challenge of “working fast, in all weathers, in front of the subject.

He is also a member of the Chelsea Art Society, Council Member of the United Society of Artists and is a founder member of the Brass Monkeys Art Society, a “hard core” group of winter outdoor painters.

He has exhibited at the Royal Academy of Arts, The Royal Society of Marine Artists, The Royal Institute of Oil Painters and The Royal Institute of Painters in Watercolour at the Mall Galleries in London.

Workshop Booking details

En Plein Air Oil Painting in Changing Light with Michael Richardson September 17, 2016 3-7.30pm 10-12 spaces available £45 Bring your own materials. Meet at the Albatros Ship.
Wells-next-the-Sea Artist Workshops
Please select below taking place from 3-7.30pm on September 17, 2016, at Wells-next-the-Sea. Workshop package is £45. On Sunday 18th 6-10am optional paint out to try out your newly-learned skills at £10 or £20 with artists\' brunch on the Albatros.
Michael Richardson tutoring Art Workshop at Paint Out Wells 2015
Michael Richardson tutoring Art Workshop at Paint Out Wells 2015

Why should anyone tell me I can’t paint a sunset? – Hermann Albert

Thomas Cole L Allegro Italian Sunset 1845

“You can’t paint that anymore these days”

Why can’t you paint what has been painted before? German artist, Hermann Albert asked in 1972 of whether one can still paint an idyllic Tuscan countryside scene. “Why can’t you? You can do everything. Why should anyone tell me I can’t paint a sunset?”

“In the summer of 1972 I was in Florence for a while, and one weekend I went on a trip to the mountains with some colleagues. We got out of the car and there we were standing in the Tuscan countryside, with cypress trees, the olive groves and the old houses–it was harmony…. The sun was setting and soon it was out of sight, but the rays of sunlight were still, illuminating the countryside obliquely, the shadows were getting longer and longer, and you could sense the approach of nightfall although it was really still daytime. We stood there, with our own consciousness, looking at this dramatic spectacle, and suddenly one of us said “Its a pity you can’t paint that anymore these days.” That had been a key word I’d heard ever since I started trying to be a painter. And I said to him, out of pure impudence: “Why can’t you? You can do everything.” It was only after I’d said it that I realized what had initially been a piece of provocation was really true. Why should anyone tell me I can’t paint a sunset?” – Hermann Albert from an exhibition catalogue, 1985 by Thiele-Dohrmann

Michael Richardson painting the Forum, Norwich Oct 2014
Michael Richardson painting the Forum, Norwich Oct 2014

In commenting, on whether repetition of what has been painted before lacks originality, the art critic Arthur Coleman Danto decried that on the contrary one should neither be put off nor be blinded to the freshness of the new interpretation.

“As a critic, I am never put off by the fact that what an artist does has been done before. That someone did it “first,” it seems to me, is often an observation that only blinds you to what the artist did who did it “second.” The repetition need not entail a lack of originality.” – Arthur Coleman Danto, 1993 

James Colman, one of the founders of Paint Out Norwich (and now Wells-next-the-Sea), was inspired to set up a plein air arts competition that draws dozens of artists with easels to paint similar locations but each interpreting it in their own ways. He says:

Timothy Betjeman painting St John's Roman Catholic Cathedral, Norwich, October 2014
Timothy Betjeman painting St John’s Roman Catholic Cathedral, Norwich, October 2014

“Until you’ve started the plein air journey your perception as to what it takes to do it to a very high standard may be clouded by having to walk on the shoulders of giants or having to overcome the fear of being ridiculed as some outmoded eccentric. Forget that straight away. Easel painting never went away. Pick up your brushes and come and join us in Wells. You may surprise yourself. It will open up a whole new world of challenges. You will meet new and interesting people and it will be a lot of fun along the way. See you there!”

Easels are indeed not dead, in fact, they are being revived as Paint Out and other plein air events revive open air painting across the UK, Ireland, Europe, and America. You can see easels everywhere during 9-11 September in Wells, North Norfolk and 20-22 October in Norwich. You can apply to take part or enter the public sunrise ‘paint out’.

 

 

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